Bits and Bobs

Bits and Bobs

Tetris is what my mind immediately conjured up when I first saw Suel Novellís art installation Zoom. Obviously it was a foolish and uniformed first instinct, but itís not hard to see why I immediately leaped to that conclusion. Novellís installation consists of a series of small, interlocked rectangular-shaped canvases, each placed a certain distance and position from one another on the wall and painted over in a variety of vivid colours and patterns. While I found them to be delightfully gaudy (and fun-sized too!), I wonít say that my attention was truly captured by the artworks. At least, not until I discovered the idea that inspired them, as well as the projection (that comprised half the installation) that I probably shouldíve watched before I even went near the paintings. Oops.

The idea of nature is emphasised through the depiction of the four forces of fire, earth, air and water in the projection, which are represented in a pixellated manner that explains the cube-like form of Novellís artworks. Novell draws a connection between pixels, the building blocks of the digital world, and atoms, their real-world equivalents, to emphasise the way in which these tiny elements constantly overlap in our daily environment, making up both the natural and man-made forms and structures around us. Looking at the rectangular artworks and the way they physically connect, itís not difficult to see how they might represent both atoms and pixels Ė the latter of which means that my initial impression of Tetris wasnít so far off after all...

If you think St Daveís is a bit of a peculiar space in which to exhibit artwork, consider again the subject matter of Novellís installation. Zoom effectively communicates the commingling of science and art, a union that in my opinion should occur far more often. At the very least, it might further my stunted science education.

Zoom by Sue Novell
Science Library | 27 July Ė 23 August 6, 12
This article first appeared in Issue 20, 2012.
Posted 5:14pm Sunday 12th August 2012 by Beaurey Chan.